How To Pick A Good Boarding Kennel

Brown and White Dog Sleeping

 

It can be hard to leave your dog or cat at a boarding facility while you are away on vacation or business since we often times consider them family members. Make sure to do your research to find the kennel that best suits your pet’s needs. Some kennels are very basic and some have all of the extras. Here are some tips on finding a good boarding kennel for your pet.

 

Looking for a Kennel

When you are starting to look for a boarding kennel, one of the best places to start is by word of mouth from people you know and trust. Getting an honest opinion from someone that has used a boarding kennel can be one of the best evaluation of the facility.

It is a good idea to research a kennel as soon as you bring a cat or dog home, just in case you have an emergency or suddenly need to leave home. Some great places to start looking are by searching online, in the phone book, or even calling Dupont Veterinary Clinic to ask your veterinarian. When searching online, the boarding kennel may have a blog or place for customers to write their own reviews of their services.

 

Dog Looking at Laptop

 

Services

Make a trip to the facility in person before scheduling your pet to board. Be sure to look at the sleeping area for your pet, where they will be exercised, the overall cleanliness, and take a look at how comfortable the staff is with your pet and other animals at the facility.

Look at all of the additional services that the facility provides, do they include extra play time or exercise, do they play with your dog, or do they have organized play time with the other dogs. If your pet has a specific diet be sure to communicate that to the facility and see how they will accommodate that or if you need to bring food from home. Talk to the boarding facility about any medications they may be taking to see if they are comfortable or able to give those medications. Especially if your dog is diabetic and needs daily insulin injections, ask them if they would be able to give these injections at the facility and if they are able to properly store the insulin bottle. If your pet has specific health needs make sure you ask them what the facility would do in case of a medical emergency. If your pet has a special bed, blanket or toys, find out if you can bring them when they stay there. Those familiar items may help decrease your pet’s anxiety while being away from home.

 

 

2 Puppies Playing With Soccer Ball

 

Find out Which Immunizations are Required

Once you have selected a boarding facility, be sure to get a list of immunizations your pet will need in order to stay there. Compare the list to your records or call your veterinarian at Dupont Veterinary Clinic to determine if your pet is up to date on all vaccines. Be sure to look at your pet’s vaccine records ahead of time so you can schedule an appointment with your veterinarian if needed.

 

What to Bring

When taking your pet to the boarding kennel be sure to take any food, medications, toys, or bedding with you. Bring copies of your pet’s vaccination records to show proof of immunization if needed. It is also important to leave multiple phone numbers and an emergency contact just in case it is needed while you are out of town.

 

Cute Tan Dog Leaving Kennel

 

Once you have found the kennel that you are comfortable with and your pet is current on all their vaccines, you are ready to leave town! Taking these additional steps ahead of time will ensure that your pet is more comfortable and you will be less concerned about their well-being while you are away. We at Dupont Veterinary Clinic hope you and yours have a happy and healthy holiday season!

Patient Spotlight – Ringo’s New Drumsticks!

Ringo is a Labrador with a new hip replacement 

 

Meet Ringo, a five-year-old happy-go-lucky Labrador Retriever. Ringo, like a lot of large breed dogs, was born with abnormal hips or a condition called Hip Dysplasia. Hip dysplasia worsens during the rapid growth phase of puppies and refers to the poor fit of the “ball and socket” nature of the hip. Ringo, like other dogs with hip dysplasia, did not have a ball and socket that fit together smoothly. Instead the socket (acetabulum) is flattened and the ball is not held tightly in place, which allows for more movement or slipping in the hip joint. Over time all of the movement in the hip joint results in the development of painful arthritis.

 

           X-Ray of Normal Hip  Normal Hip

X-Ray of dog with hips dysplasia  Early Hip Dysplasia

Ringo went to see Dr. Steve Harry at Dupont Veterinary Clinic for lameness and pain in his hips. Ringo’s hip dysplasia was treated over a prolonged period of time; however, his arthritis and pain continued to worsen. Dr. Harry along with Ringo’s owners decided to refer him to a specialist where he would be evaluated for a total hip replacement. In July of this year Ringo was considered a candidate and was approved for a total hip replacement. Ringo stayed over night at the specialty hospital and underwent the procedure the following day.

 

X-ray of a dog with severe hip dysplasia

Ringo’s Before Surgery X-ray

During the procedure the “socket” (or acetabulum) of the hip is deepened and replaced with a prosthetic socket and a prosthetic “ball” is inserted in order to replace the existing hip joint. The goal of the surgery is to give Ringo a pain-free, normal functioning hip. Even though Ringo has hip dysplasia affecting both the left and right hip joint only the right side was given a total hip replacement. Eighty percent of patients with arthritis in both hips only require surgery on one side in order for them to live a comfortable life. The decision of which hip to replace is dependent on which hip is more painful or has a greater limit in mobility.

 

X-ray of a dog's pelvis after a hip replacement

Close-Up X-ray of a hip replacement

Ringo’s After Surgery X-rays

Ringo is doing exceedingly well after his surgery! He is living a much more comfortable and happy life at home with his brother, Wyatt, where they are back to their normal antics.  Check out his progress in this video!!

“Ringo” Enjoying Life After His Hip Replacement

If you are concerned about your pet possibly having hip dysplasia or believe they may be a candidate for a total hip replacement, contact your veterinarian at Dupont Veterinary Clinic for more information.  We at Dupont Veterinary Clinic strive to provide clients with the best health care at the forefront of veterinary medicine.

If you are interested in learning more about the total hip replacement surgery, click the following link to watch an animated overview of the technique.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTLhcLxT-0o

By Dr. Ashley Dawes

Patient Spotlight – Ringo’s New Drumsticks!

Ringo is a Labrador with a new hip replacement 

 

Meet Ringo, a five-year-old happy-go-lucky Labrador Retriever. Ringo, like a lot of large breed dogs, was born with abnormal hips or a condition called Hip Dysplasia. Hip dysplasia worsens during the rapid growth phase of puppies and refers to the poor fit of the “ball and socket” nature of the hip. Ringo, like other dogs with hip dysplasia, did not have a ball and socket that fit together smoothly. Instead the socket (acetabulum) is flattened and the ball is not held tightly in place, which allows for more movement or slipping in the hip joint. Over time all of the movement in the hip joint results in the development of painful arthritis.

 

           X-Ray of Normal Hip  Normal Hip

X-Ray of dog with hips dysplasia  Early Hip Dysplasia

Ringo went to see Dr. Steve Harry at Dupont Veterinary Clinic for lameness and pain in his hips. Ringo’s hip dysplasia was treated over a prolonged period of time; however, his arthritis and pain continued to worsen. Dr. Harry along with Ringo’s owners decided to refer him to a specialist where he would be evaluated for a total hip replacement. In July of this year Ringo was considered a candidate and was approved for a total hip replacement. Ringo stayed over night at the specialty hospital and underwent the procedure the following day.

 

X-ray of a dog with severe hip dysplasia

Ringo’s Before Surgery X-ray

During the procedure the “socket” (or acetabulum) of the hip is deepened and replaced with a prosthetic socket and a prosthetic “ball” is inserted in order to replace the existing hip joint. The goal of the surgery is to give Ringo a pain-free, normal functioning hip. Even though Ringo has hip dysplasia affecting both the left and right hip joint only the right side was given a total hip replacement. Eighty percent of patients with arthritis in both hips only require surgery on one side in order for them to live a comfortable life. The decision of which hip to replace is dependent on which hip is more painful or has a greater limit in mobility.

 

X-ray of a dog's pelvis after a hip replacement

Close-Up X-ray of a hip replacement

Ringo’s After Surgery X-rays

Ringo is doing exceedingly well after his surgery! He is living a much more comfortable and happy life at home with his brother, Wyatt, where they are back to their normal antics.  Check out his progress in this video!!

“Ringo” Enjoying Life After His Hip Replacement

If you are concerned about your pet possibly having hip dysplasia or believe they may be a candidate for a total hip replacement, contact your veterinarian at Dupont Veterinary Clinic for more information.  We at Dupont Veterinary Clinic strive to provide clients with the best health care at the forefront of veterinary medicine.

If you are interested in learning more about the total hip replacement surgery, click the following link to watch an animated overview of the technique.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTLhcLxT-0o

By Dr. Ashley Dawes