Much Ado About the Canine Flu

canine fluIf you’ve been in recently or have taken your pooch to boarding facilities, groomers, or dog parks, you may have heard talk about canine influenza. Perhaps we recommended the vaccine for your dog or you were told that Fluffy can’t have her bath without it. So, what exactly is this canine flu and why have you been hearing about it? At Dupont Veterinary Clinic, we’re here to help!

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Choosing the Right Breed for Your Family

Adding a pet into your family can be a big decision. Should you get a Dog? A cat? A gerbil..? Once you have decided that adding a fuzzy (or feathered… or scaly?) family member is the right move for all involved, you’ll need to put some careful thought into which pet you choose.

One size does not fit all when it comes to matching the best pet to a family, and choosing the right species is essential. You also need to carefully consider all the options when it comes to choosing the right breed within the species, in order to ensure a good fit for your home.

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What Should I Bring to Our Vet Visit?

By Ashley Dawes, DVM

Bringing your pet in for a vet visit can be stressful, whether it is for a routine visit or for a problem. We at Dupont Veterinary Clinic have put together a list of items to bring with you to help make your visit as stress-free and easy as possible.

Your Pre-Vet Visit Checklist

Planning ahead can make your pet’s vet visit more productive for all involved. Before you and your pet jump in the car, be sure you have the following: Continue…

What is Rabies?

What is Rabies?

Rabies is an acute viral infection that is invariably fatal. It affects all warm-blooded animals including dogs and cats. The disease is almost always caused by the bite of an infected animal that has rabies virus in its saliva.

What are the signs of Rabies?

Once the rabies virus inters the body, it travels along the nerves to the brain. It can take a matter of days, weeks or months for your pet to show signs of the rabies virus. These are common signs of Rabies virus infection:

  • Change in attitude – nervousness, anxiety, shyness, aggressiveness, restlessness
  • Disorientation
  • Incoordination, weakness, seizures, paralysis
  • Change in tone of bark
  • Excessive salivation or frothing
  • Loss of fear of humans
  • Nocturnal animals seen wandering in the day

What is the prognosis for Rabies?

The prognosis is grave. All dogs will succumb to the virus within 7 to 10 days from the onset of clinical signs.

How is Rabies prevented?

Rabies can be prevented by vaccination. As such, vaccinating your dog is critical. There is both a city and state law mandating that all dogs be vaccinated for Rabies. This is for the protection of both your dog as well as people since human exposure can have dire consequences. Talk to us to discuss the best recommendations for preventing Rabies in your pet through a vaccination program.